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Dr Judy Ford: The Lifestyle Doctor

HEALTH PROFESSIONALS


Insight into the biology of aging will help you help your clients


Here's a short course that explains how aging works!


It’s very difficult to keep up with the advances in your own field, much less that in other disciplines. You might not have thought that you needed to understand the biology of aging, but I think that you’ll find that it both helps your own health and in understanding and helping your patients.


There’s no doubt that feeling fit and healthy contributes positively to ALL aspects of life. But time works against us and without some specific changes in our diet and lifestyle, our health will greatly decline as we age.


The FIRST THE UNDENIABLE FACT is that whatever age we are now, in ten years’ time we will either be ten years older or dead! But the challenge is to be at least as healthy or even healthier in ten years’ time than we are now, for as many years as possible.


It is well known that LIFESTYLE and external ENVIRONMENTAL factors contribute significantly to health and longevity but there are BIOLOGICAL FACTORS that underly the whole of aging. No doubt you will have heard of some or all of TELOMERES, BILIPID MEMBRANES, p53 GENE, APOPTOSIS and CELLULAR SENESCENCE but do you understand how all of these are involved as a single process in biological aging? More importantly do you realize that it’s quite easy to understand how these factors work together to cause the INFLAMMATION associated with AGING and AGE-RELATED diseases, and easier still for you to work with your clients/patients to minimize their inflammation. At the same time, you will be able to increase their ENERGY, REDUCE THEIR PAIN and improve their enjoyment of life.


MY BACKGROUND TO CREATING THIS COURSE

I became interested in questions relating to aging when I was just a young child. One day, when we were playing in our back lane, I met a boy with Down’s syndrome and wondered what was wrong with this very nice boy and why he couldn’t understand how to play our games? I decided there and then that I was going to work out what could be done about this?


Fast forward about fifteen years and I have a PhD in genetics and much of my early postgraduate work revolves around prenatal diagnosis of Down Syndrome. As you might know, Down syndrome is caused by an individual having three copies of chromosome 21 in most of their cells and this is usually initiated by an error in the division of the mother’s cells that produce her eggs. These types of mistakes can occur at any age but are always greatly increased as a woman grows older – the risk is increased exponentially from about age 37.


I spent many years researching this problem, but an important early finding we made was that the types of errors of cell division that lead to Down syndrome were not limited to the eggs but that they also occurred in other cells, for example blood cells, at the same age. In other words, serious biological aging starts at about age 37 and it is a WHOLE BODY problem.


Because my journey through science wasn’t always smooth – for example, a change in political power in South Australia closed all hospital-based laboratories, I wasn’t able to continue any laboratory research. Nevertheless, in 2009 I was very privileged to be sent the data from females in the Scottish Heart Study and from my analyses of the data on fatty acids, I wrote several publications including “Saturated fatty acid metabolism is key link between cell division, cancer, and senescence in cellular and whole organism aging” (Age (Dordr) 2010 Jun;32(2):231-7). However, since my research and publication time was limited, I couldn’t pursue this at the time. To try to make up for this, now that I am officially retired, I am writing books and creating courses to teach people about the process of aging and what they can do to reduce its negative effects. And of course, as I write, I learn from other published research and I’m keen to share everything I am learning with anyone who wants to optimize their own health and is willing to make some changes where necessary.


The full content of the course can be seen on the link below and when you click through, you can watch the introductory video. I look forward to working with you through the Course Facebook Group and your ‘course homework’. 

Course: Biology of Aging for Health Professionals

Click to see the full course outline and to watch the Introductory Video

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